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Frequently Asked Questions
  •  Should I have a birth plan?
    • There are many samples of birth plans available online to use as a guide for creating your individualized birth plan. Problems in your health history prior to labor or problems that occur during labor may result in changes in your plan for your and your baby’s safety. The more prepared and knowledgeable you are regarding your labor, delivery, and postpartum care, the better chance you will have in achieving your birthing goals. A plan is a guideline; you can change your mind at any time. You and your delivery team will work together to make this the best possible life event for you!
  • When should I come to labor and delivery?
    • If you are under 20 weeks gestational age and are having any bleeding, cramping, or concerns and you think you need to be seen by a health care professional, you need to either be seen in the OB/GYN clinic or the Emergency Department
    • If you are over 20 weeks gestation, you should come to the Birthing Unit for assessment if you have any vaginal bleeding or vaginal gush of fluid (note the time and color and put on a peripad), decreased fetal movements (ref. page 118 in purple pregnancy book for fetal kick counts and charts)
    • If you have a medical emergency, call 911
  • I am scheduled for an induction, what should I do?
    • If you are scheduled for an induction, plan to call the Birthing Unit (910-907-7563) around 6 a.m. the morning of your induction. This phone call is to ensure there is a room available for you. Before you arrive to the unit make sure to eat breakfast/lunch/dinner and shower/bathe.
  • I am scheduled for a cesarean section (c-section), what should I do?
    • If you are scheduled for a c-section, DO NOT eat or drink anything after midnight. Plan to call the Birthing Unit around 5 a.m. the morning of your operation. This phone call is to ensure the plan for you to have your c-section has not changed, and to make sure we have an operating room open. You will need to take a shower/bath and plan to arrive at the Birthing Center at 6 a.m. on the morning of your C-section.
  • How many visitors can I have in my Labor and Delivery?
    • Each patient is encouraged to have labor supporters to stay with them throughout the labor, delivery, and immediate postpartum period while in the Birthing Unit. Other family and friends are asked to wait in the family waiting room. Siblings are permitted in the Labor Rooms with “1” adult per sibling. The adult is not to be the Mother’s support person (Dad, Friend, etc). If the adult supervising the sibling leaves, the sibling must leave too. No children/siblings are allowed in the Triage area.
  • What are the visiting hours on labor and delivery?
    • We do not have set visiting hours in the Birthing Center
  • Can my children be present for the delivery?
    • Siblings are permitted in the Labor Rooms with “1” adult per sibling. The adult is not to be the Mother’s support person (Dad, Friend, etc). If the adult supervising the sibling leaves, the sibling must leave too. No children/siblings are allowed in the Triage area.
    • It is suggested that they arrive in comfortable clothes and pack a bag with books, small toys, appropriate electronic devices, and snacks. Staff reserve the right to request children be accompanied to the waiting area during emergencies or special circumstances.
  • What are my options for pain management?
    • You will be provided a wide range of options for pain management. These include breathing techniques and position changes, IV medications, and also epidural analgesia. What route you take for pain management will depend on your preparation for the labor, the baby, how far along you are in your labor, the mother’s health, and the decision you and your health care team agree on.
  • Do I have to have an intravenous infusion (IV)?
    • An IV is generally used during the labor process as a way to give you hydration, medications, and provides a route to access your venous system in an emergency.
  • Can I walk around while I am in labor?
    • Many patients choose to walk and sit in a rocking chair or birth ball while they are in labor. As long as your baby is doing well and you haven’t received any medications that could interfere with walking, your physician may order for you to walk around if you desire. Many times, walking around can be very comfortable to women during the early part of labor.
  • What is Pitocin?
    • Pitocin is a medication that is the synthetic form of the hormone your body already produces (oxytocin) to stimulate uterine contractions. Pitocin is sometimes ordered by your physician to induce or augment your labor. Your nurse and health care provider will discuss administration of Pitocin before starting it on you.
  • Do you have a nursery?
    • We do not have a newborn nursery.  We promote couplet care: mothers and newborns remain together for the entire hospital stay. For infants who require more medical care than what can be provided in a room, WAMC has a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.
  • Does Womack provide childbirth education?
    • We offer a 4 series class in Weaver Auditorium that includes education on labor, delivery, breastfeeding, and newborn care.
  • Concerns during your stay or not fully satisfied?
    • If you have any concerns during your stay or are not fully satisfied with your experience, please contact the Birthing Center Head Nurse at (910) 907- 7543

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